stop smoking

Old habits die hard, and smoking is one of the hardest to kick. You don’t need me to tell you why it’s important – it’s one of the deadliest habits you can have! Not only will your lungs thank you, but you’ll be at lesser risk for many types of cancer, your blood pressure will lower and you’ll feel like you have a new lease on life! Since we don’t need to go into the ‘whys’, we’ll dive straight into the ‘hows’!

Think about chemical help

Before you quit for good, think about how long you’ve been smoking and how many cigarettes you go through a day. If it’s a large amount, and you don’t think you can cut yourself off cold turkey, you might want to consider nicotine replacement therapy. This can come in lots of different ways – patches, gum or lozenges for example. The great thing about this therapy is that it will minimise any side effects you’ll get from nicotine withdrawal.

Avoid potential triggers

Try to stay away from things that would naturally cause you to want to smoke. The most obvious things are nights out drinking alcohol, smoking buddies and anywhere else you’ll encounter smokers. Make sure to throw out all your paraphernalia – all lighters and ashtrays must go! Try avoiding caffeine too, as it’ll make your withdrawal jitters feel so much worse. As for positive changes, try heading to places that don’t allow smoking, and spend time with non-smoking friends and acquaintances.

Keep yourself and your hands busy

Anyone who has tried to quit smoking before can tell you that half the battle is the loss of something to do with your hands! Popular ways to combat the missing ‘physical’ sides of smoking include chewing gum or hard candy, playing with pens or even fidget toys (who knew fidget spinners were good for something!). There’s also a problem with what to do when you usually would be taking a smoke break – getting into the habit of going outside every few hours is deceptively hard to break. Instead, try exercise, deep breathing or even just stepping out for a 5-minute walk.

Save for something good

Once smoking is ingrained, it’s difficult to see just how much money you’re spending on the habit. Once you quit, try saving the cash you would’ve spent on cigarettes in a glass jar somewhere visible, or keep track on an app or in your phone notes. The idea behind this is that you’ll see exactly how much money you’re saving, spurring you on to keep saving and quit spending! Another idea is to come up with something to spend your saved money on. Imagine something you’ve been wanting to buy yourself for a while, or even save up for a weekend away – anything to congratulate yourself on your new smoke-free life.